Romane Gilia ft. Tcha Limberger, Vol. 1

$34.99

A collection of rare Manouche Gypsy songs featuring Tcha Limberger on guitar/violin/viola/bass/vocals. Read full description…

A collection of rare Manouche Gypsy songs featuring Tcha Limberger on guitar/violin/viola/bass/vocals.

Contains:

-HD video performances of Tcha Limberger.
-Backing tracks of each song with possibilities for muted bass/violin/rhythm guitar/lead -guitar (when relevent).
-Lessons on each song regarding interpretation and choice of voicings
-Lead sheets included: melody and harmony. Please note, lyrics are not included
-Guitar voicings for Eastern European style songs (Dui Dui & Fuli Tschai). TAB and standard notation
-Tcha's favorite chord voicings for common chord progressions. TAB and standard notation
-3 Improvisation Etudes for guitar transcribed in TAB and standard notation
-3 Improvisation Etudes for violin transcribed in standard notation
mp3 recordings of each song

Songs:

Tut Hi Tschi, Man Hi Tschi
Kei Djas Kan Miri Pirni
Tschawo
Dui Dui
Fuli Tschai
Pasch Tutte
Me Hum Mato
Tu Djayal

Etudes

Tschawo
Me Hum Mato
Tu Djayal

Recommended prerequesites:

-Intermediate/advanced knowledge of Gypsy Jazz concepts (technique, accompaniment and improvisation)
-Backing tracks are for: bass players, violinists, and guitarists (or all instruments)
About Romane Gilia:

Romane Gilia in Sinti Romani means Gypsy songs. Romani is the language of the Gypsies. The dialect in these songs is the dialect spoken by the Sinti, also known as Manouche. The Sinti mainly live in western Europe in countries such as Germany, France, Holland, Belgium, northern Italy. The legendary jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt was a Sinto. At the height of his popularity, and following his death, he inspired many within his community to pursue a similar musical path. These Sinti then gave birth to what is now called Gypsy Jazz or Jazz Manouche; a broad and even ambiguous term to describe what has become somewhat of a folkloric style.

The songs presented in this collection are rarely heard outside of the Manouche community. These songs are often melodies inspired by various folk styles of music played by Gypsies across Europe, but adapted within the context of Django Reinhardt's style. These songs exemplify the Gypsy aspect of Gypsy Jazz.

The Sinti dialect of Romani has no standardized spelling system, and, as such, each song will be spelled differently according to what one hears and according to the rules of each host country's spelling system; the French may write Fouli Tchaï; whereas the Dutch may write Voeli Tschaj, etc. Furthermore, since the language is strictly passed on orally, many variations of the dialect exist. Tcha Limberger, a Belgian Sinto, speaks the dialect of many Belgian Sinti. Last but not least, the issue of language is extremely sensitive in the Sinti community; many do not want outsiders to understand their language. As respect to the Sinti community, we have chosen not to provide the lyrics and translations to these songs.

About Tcha Limberger:

Tcha Limberger was born in a ‘Manouche’ family with a long-standing musical tradition (his grandfather was the legendary Piotto Limberger). Both his father Vivi, singer and guitar player, and his Flemish mother raised him to understand and appreciate their respective cultures. As a child, Tcha was determined to become a flamenco singer. At age twelve, he started playing the clarinet, joining the family orchestra ‘The Piotto’s’. Meanwhile, he studied the flamenco guitar, but because of a lack of good teachers, he switched to Django-style guitar playing, learning from masters such as Fapy Lafertin and Koen De Cauter. At that time, he worked with ‘Het Muziek Lod’, where he met Dick Vanderharst, who introduced him to contemporary classical music and modern jazz. Tcha’s good friend and colleague, Herman Schamp, exposed him even more deeply to classical music and composing. When Tcha was seventeen, he started studying the violin, inspired by stories on his grand-father and recordings of Toki Horvath. By the time he was twenty-one, he left Belgium for Budapest, where he took classical and tzigane classes from Horvath Bela.

IMPORTANT: Please note that these are streamed videos; only the PDF transcriptions can be downloaded. When access is purchased, you will have permanent access to this lesson and all updates/corrections (if any) will be free of charge!

66 minutes across 24 parts

1. Introduction
2. Chords - Me Hum Mato
3. Chords - Tschawo
4. Chords - Tut Hi Tschi, Man Hi Tschi
5. Chords - Kei Djas Kan Miri Pirni
6. Chords - Tu Djayal
7. Chords - Dui Dui
8. Chords - Fuli Tschai
9. Chords - Pasch Tutte
10. Final Thoughts
Performance: “Tut Hi Tschi”
Performance: “Kei Djas Kan Miri Pirni”
Performance: “Tschawo”
Performance: “Dui Dui”
Performance: “Fuli Tschai”
Performance: “Pasch Tutte”
Performance: “Me Hum Mato”
Performance: “Tu Djayal”
Etude: Guitar - Me Hum Mato
Etude: Guitar - Tschawo
Etude: Guitar - Tu Djayal
Etude: Violin - Me Hum Mato
Etude: Violin - Tschawo
Etude: Violin - Tu Djayal

When you buy

When you buy this, you’ll get instant access to everything. Our videos will play directly in your web browser — there is nothing to download or install. It works on tablets and smartphones, too.

Note that videos cannot be downloaded, though you can use our “Save offline” feature if you’re using a new version of Google Chrome or Firefox.

Questions? Contact us any time.